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Raw and Open: Social Media and Suicide

Guest Author: Jody Betty

This content contains explicit and sensitive information that may not be suitable for all ages.

We are consumed with technology. It surrounds us at every corner.

We not only cannot tear ourselves away from our cell phones, but simply being away from them causes us stress. After all, most of our lives are stored on that tiny device, from our banking information to the ability to lock your car or front door.

We avoid talking on the phone like it is the plague, I mean after all, why speak when you can communicate via text, so much easier right? Social media is much the same, once we jump in, it tends to become all consuming. We share our thoughts, our pictures and lives with friends and strangers, all with the press of a button. We live in a world with more people than ever, yet have more lonely people than ever before. Is technology responsible for this social disconnection, or perhaps, does it do the exact opposite and connect us in ways we never thought possible twenty years ago? 

I was recently chastised for being too real.

Social media has the ability to connect us with our business partners, our loved ones and perhaps most importantly, strangers. It allows us to be our true selves with less fear of judgment or to hide ourselves as someone different, while still allowing the freedom to express our thoughts and emotions. Sometimes the best advice and support you receive is from a group of people you may not even know online. Random strangers with similar thoughts, reaching out to others, to let them know they don’t have to struggle with their emotions alone.

A kind word, a supportive quote, or even a cute picture can drastically change someone’s day, or more importantly can get someone through a crisis.

I was recently chastised for being too real; for expressing too much. I simply spoke my feelings at that moment, which happened to be particularly dark ones. I was then told that because I express my suicidal thoughts online, I am actually advocating for and encouraging suicide.

Obviously, that comment did not go down well. Not only was I hurt, but incredibly insulted, as I have spent much of my time online trying to help others to realize they are not alone. I thought about it a while, trying to see if I had overreacted to what was said, but the longer I pondered it, the more I realized two important things. 

They need to be heard.

The first being that I believe people should be able to express how they feel without fear of condemnation, without fear of police involvement and the threat of being locked up in a facility. Secondly, the more honest I am with my words, the better the chances of reaching others, of letting them know they share those thoughts with so many, and as alone as they feel, if they reach out, so many people will reach back, and that is what drives me to continue. Happy quotes serve their purpose, but nothing makes someone feel more understood than empathy.

I am not sure there is such a thing as an expert on suicide. Those with their PHDs may have all the knowledge in the world but you cannot teach empathy. Sympathy perhaps, but empathy comes from lived experience, it comes from the heart and the soul. Being suicidal is like having any other mental illness, I believe it can’t be fully understood unless you have actually experienced it, and no class in the world can teach you how something feels to someone else.

Having been both actively and passively suicidal for forty years, I believe has given me more insight than most doctors will have in their life. In most cases, if someone is online and talking about suicide, they are in fact trying their best to reach out. They need to be heard and to have their feelings validated. They need to know that these thoughts and emotions are shared by so many others and what better way to reach out, than to ask for support from countless strangers who have lived experience. In no way am I trying to downplay the seriousness of the situation, and in some cases, intervention may be needed, but instead of assuming, let’s start by asking one simple question…How can I help? You don’t need any formal training to listen, to reassure, to support and validate, you just have to be willing to give of yourself and your time.

There truly is strength in numbers.

You talking about, asking about or even mentioning suicide is NOT a bad thing. It will NOT encourage or enhance suicidal thoughts. Let me tell you that once you are in that desperate frame of mind, it already seems like the end of the world, so nothing you can say is going to make it worse, however, just asking the question, “How can I help?” can make someone feel like they are cared about in the moment, and sometimes that is all you need.

Someone to sit with you, to guide you through those moments of crisis, because, like everything in life, those feelings will change. They may come back. Hell, I live with mine 24/7 but I know that all I have to do is reach out and the social media support network will be there. There truly is strength in numbers.

Jody Betty is a guest blogger for SickNotWeak who, in her own words, is a master at the art of survival. She lives with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and is co-afflicted with MDD, Dysthymia and Social Anxiety. She has survived three serious suicide attempts and a handful of overdoses which lets her know it isn’t her time. You can read her blog “Raw and Open” posted tri-weekly on Thursdays on SNW.

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