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Panic over manic

Guest Author: Marlene

This content contains explicit and sensitive information that may not be suitable for all ages.

I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder about 35 years ago.

I have been able to manage it with a small amount of medication and psychiatric support. I was very proud that I had been stable for over 11 years.

This fall, my older sister and my aunt, who I had bee quite close to, started to conduct what can only be called a witch hunt. They convinced my best friend and another friend into thinking that I was having a manic episode, but I was not.

I realized this was starting to happen and arranged a family meeting with my psychiatrist who has been my doctor for many years.

I wanted my family and friends to understand that a bit of manic is normal for me and it should be understood just as a little depression is normal for me in winter months.

There is a great shortage of psychiatrists in my city.

My sister, supported by my aunt, had a Form 2 issued. I was arrested on the very day I was supposed to have my family meeting.

I was released after the assessment and the psychiatrist called my sister to indicate that, in her opinion, I did not require additional mental health support. My sister wouldn’t accept that. To this day, she won’t accept that she was in the wrong.

I had started private weekly therapy in order to help me deal with that has basically left me with PTSD. It is very helpful but it’s going to take some time before I have my emotions under control. In the Spring, my psychiatrist indicated that because I was stable for 11 years, my GP could handle my file. But now that there had been a Form 2, my GP wanted me to have a psychiatrist.

I’m hoping I can continue at the mental health centre but that has not been confirmed yet. I have many thick files there after 30 years of treatment and I don’t want to start over now.

There is a great shortage of psychiatrists in my city, which is a real problem for both patients and GPs, alike.

Having a mental illness takes a lot of emotional strength.

I am hoping to reconcile with my family at some point but I’m still angry with them for how they have treated me. My counsellor says that some people will never admit they made a mistake. I hoped that my family would not be some of those people, but it appears that they are.

Having a mental illness takes a lot of emotional strength and I have found that it is very difficult to get support that is helpful, however, I think that has only made me stronger.

I am fortunate to have found medication that works for me.

Michael’s blog helps to give me strength and I start each day with it. It gives me hope that there will be better times ahead.

Thank you for reading my story.

This is Part 2 of Marlene’s story. Part 1 – Comfort in a lonely time – can be found here.

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